State of Our Union comes out with the latest news about divorce in America: fuelled by the National Marriage Project and Center for Marriage and Families

Breaking Divorce News: State of our Union dot org has come out with their annual joint publication by the National Marriage Project at the University of Virginia and the Center for Marriage and Families at the Institute for American Values, and their studies show some interesting, though not very surprising statistics. 
The editor Barbara Wilcox’s executive summary reads as follows:

Newdata indicate that trends in nonmarital childbearing, divorce, and marital quality in Middle America increasingly resemble those of the poor, where marriage is fragile and weak. Yet among the highly educated and affluent, marriage is stable and appears to be getting even stronger.

Using data from the Census Bureau and the Center for Disease Control, their findings are as follows:
1) The divorce rate is between 40 -50 percent for all Americans.
2) The divorce rate peaked in the 1980’s
3) People are marrying for the first time at older ages and this is contributing to the drop in the divorce rate from its 80’s high.
4) Marriage is increasingly becoming the “province of the affluent and well educated.”
5) There are more divorced women than there are divorced men (men seem to be able to find new mates easier than women are, no big surprise)
6) Blacks have a higher divorce rate than Whites – although this is increasingly not the case (she attributes that to the fact that fewer blacks are getting married in the first place.)
7) People in the South are more likely to divorce than people in the West
8) Religion plays a big role in people staying married
9) Teenagers are more likely to divorce than other groups
10) Less educated people are more likely to divorce than educated people.

From The State of Our Union:

FactorsPercent Decrease
in Risk of Divorce
Making over $50,000 annually (vs. under $25,000)-30%
Having graduated college (vs. not completed high school)-25%
Having a baby seven months or more after marriage (vs. before marriage)-24%
Marrying over 25 years of age (vs. under 18)-24%
Coming from an intact family of origin (vs. divorced parents)-14%
Religious affiliation (vs. none)-14%

FYI: State of Our Unions monitors the current health of marriage and family life in America. Produced annually, it is a joint publication of the National Marriage Project at the University of Virginia and the Center for Marriage and Families at the Institute for American Values.

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